Wednesday, December 10, 2014

New Malekko Modules Are Now Shipping

Buffered
Multi
Mix 4
Unity
Mixer
The people at Malekko have been crafting a new series of Eurorack modules from affordable creative synthesis designs to performance tools

They are very happy to announce the first three in this series are now available through your favorite modular retailers!

MIX 4
This 3hp 4-channel mixer is the first to literally fill the odd hp gap - Harvestman users rejoice!
MIX 4 also features DC coupling for mixing low frequency as well as CV.

UNITY MIXER
The 2hp Unity Mixer is a little powerhouse of unity gain mixing capability. 2 sets of 3 inputs (1 out per set) offers up your basic configuration, then hit the SWITCH button to allow for 6 total inputs (1 out). Unity Mixer also supports CV so the SWITCH button makes this module a great option for rerouting combinations of signals on the fly and is perfect for live performance!

PERFORMANCE BUFFERED MULT
The 2hp Performance Buffered Mult features 2 sets of 3 outputs (1 audio or CV signal in with 3 buffered outs) and the SWITCH button allows for a total of 6 outputs without signal loss for on the fly multiplying.

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

Modular Wild Presents - Evaton Technologies RF Nomad Shortwave Radio Module

Raul Pena started a new Modular Wild series about the Evaton Technologies RF Nomad Shortwave Radio Eurorack Module.

Video 1: Modular Wild Presents Profile-Evaton Technologies RF Nomad

" A short overview of some of the basic features of the RF Nomad.Sound Demonstrations to follow. Sound and Video by Raul Pena."
New episodes will be added here weekly

More info on the RF Nomad: http://www.evatontechnologies.com/rf-nomad

Can't wait to hear some noises out of this module?
MylarMelodies has also published an RF Nomad Tutorial video that you can find in an earlier blogpost HERE. (With even more info about this module...)
Check out Raul's latest survey at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/K3Z9PVF
Other places to find Raul's World of Synths on the Web:

Friday, November 28, 2014

Animodule V9A VC Sequencer / Waveshaper / Complex Envelope Demo by @DivKid

Animodule V9A
DivKid's latest Eurorack tutorial video is all about the Animodule V9A Voltage Controlled Sequencer / Waveshaper / Complex Envelope

" The V9A is a powerful animal to add to your sequencing arsenal.
Send your CV to the CV In. As the Voltage increases the sequence steps forward.
As the voltage decreases the sequence steps back.
Scale and adjust your input voltage to taste with the Onboard Attenuator and Offset.
Control the Output CV with an individual Potentiometer for each step.
When a step changes, a 10MS trigger is sent to it's corresponding switch. If the latching switch is depressed it allows the trigger to pass to the Trigger Out.
There is a switch per step for slew (portamento/slide).
and a Potentiometer to control the Slew Amount.
There is also an input to allow gated control of when the slew turns on and off which will work in conjunction with the switches."

Width: 14HP Depth: 39mm

Video: Animodule V9A

" A great module for some custom modulation even sequence, bendy LFO (through on board slew), gate trigger, CV sequencing. All sorts going on.
As always fire away with any questions and hit like and subscribe for more videos every week."

Video by Ben Wilson / DivKid - www.youtube.com/divkidvideo

Thursday, November 27, 2014

MakeNoise Richter Wogglebug Update

MakeNoise gave their Richter Wogglebug a nice update.
"The "WoggleBug" is a random voltage generator, originally designed by Grant Richter of Wiard Synthesizers.

Richter Wogglebug Re-design
It is a continuation of the "smooth" and "stepped" fluctuating random voltage sources pioneered by Don Buchla within the Model 265 "Source of Uncertainty," expanding it to include the other-worldly Woggle CVs (stepped voltages with decaying sinusoids edges). 
The Wogglebug is a very musical random voltage generator where it is possible to synchronize all random signal to a Master Clock. 
Guaranteed to unleash your synthesizer's ID MONSTER!

The Wogglebug features ( check out the new features below the video):
- Complete Complex Random Voltage system, no external modules necessary
- Two VCOs, Phase Lock Loop, Lag Processor, Clock, Burst Generator and Sample & Hold
- Generates 7 Random Signals simultaneously: Smooth VCO, Woggle VCO, Ring Mod, Stepped, Smooth, Woggle, Burst
- Generates ultra stable, voltage controlled Master Clock
- External inputs for S&H (Heart IN) and Ring-Mod (Influence)
- Disturb button adds performance element
- Wonderful for modulating the Phonogene and DPO

Video: Make Noise Richter Wogglebug

" The Wogglebug is a random voltage generator, originally designed by Grant Richter of Wiard Synthesizers. It is a continuation of the "smooth" and "stepped" fluctuating random voltage sources pioneered by Don Buchla within the Model 266 "Source of Uncertainty."
New features in the Richter Wogglebug:

- A much more stable clock output with the widest frequency range yet seen on a Wogglebug. The clock now goes up to about 200Hz, allowing the Control Voltage and Gate OUTputs to be heard directly as different flavors of analog and digital noise.
- In previous Wogglebugs, the clock had been locked to the internal Sample and Hold Circuit. Now, with the Richter Wogglebug, the clock can be freed by the independent External Clock INput or the Disturb Button. Regardless of what is happening at these control points, the Internal Clock OUTput will continue to run at the specified rate, keeping it open for use as a Master Clock at all times.
- The Disturb Button allows the Sample and Hold Circuit to be clocked manually: press to sample, release to hold. When the Wogglebug is running fast, this can slow it down. When running slow or not at all, this kicks it in the ass and delivers the next set of random values.
- The Smooth VCO is a brand new waveform, Sharktooth.
- The Influence input has a greater effect on all parts of the Wogglebug's psyche than the previous Ring Mod input.
- The Burst output is more active and ALL portions of the Wogglebug are more responsive to control and touch." 

Video uploaded by MAKEN0ISE

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Doepfer Thru-Zero Modules

New A-110-2, A-110-3 and A-110-4 Modules
At a workshop in Musikhaus Hieber-Lindberg / Munich/ Germany Dieter Doepfer also presented the first prototypes of the new Thru-Zero VCOs.
I did mention the A-110-4 Quad Thru Zero in an earllier blogpost, the A-110-3 Triangle Thru-Zero was new to me.

After some questions in the Yahoo Doepfer A-100 Usergroup, Dieter had a bit more info about the new modules:

" Currently we have prototypes of three totally different types of thru-zero VCOs to be in the starting blocks:

A quadrature version with sine/cosine outputs (prefect sine/cosine outputs, much better than sine waveshapers): A-110-4
A triangle core version (with waveshapers for saw, rectangle and sine): A-110-3
A trapezoid core version (with waveshapers, based on Don Tillman's idea and with his permission): A-110-5 (?)

The A-110-4 will be manufactured early in 2015. We still have some problems with the A-110-3 and A-110-5 because the prototypes produced so far behave a bit different and we still have to find out the reason and fix the problems.

A-110-2 (final version), A-110-3 and A-110-4 will be introduced at NAMM in January (as well as A-147-2, A-138u, A-160-2, final versions of A-101-6, A-190-5 and A-157, and maybe some more). "


Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Evaton Technologies RF Nomad Shortwave Radio Eurorack Module Demo by @MylarMelodies

MylarMelodies is known for his excellent Eurorack demos, you'll probably know him as the man behind the memorable Intellijel Metropolis demo (which is going towards 50.000 views already),the Vines that he posts from his Twitter account, and more recent, his writings for FutureMusic Magazine.

His latest demo is all about the Evaton Technologies RF Nomad Shortwave Radio, read all the info in the description below the video.

Video: RF Nomad Shortwave Radio Eurorack Module Demo

" Being a demo of the considerably bonkers shortwave radio eurorack module that is the Evaton Technologies RF Nomad. LOADS of additional information below!
http://www.evatontechnologies.com/rf-...

GETTING MORE STATIONS ON RF NOMAD

"Get your antenna as high up as possible, and away from metal as much as possible. If you can clip a longer wire onto the end of it, to make the antenna longer, that will help too. I sometimes put a long wire on mine, and tape the wire up to the ceiling.

If you just can't pick up any signals with it, the tuning range is adjustable internally via tweaking the L5 inductor slug with a non-conductive screwdriver. If you are brave, power up your modular, with the Nomad hanging out of the case so you can get to the L5 inductor with a screwdriver. (Be careful not to let the module short against anything!) Set the Tuning knob to the center position, then tweak L5 until you hear stuff. Don't apply much force, and be aware that you can only turn the slug about 1 full rotation. Also, once you've done this, it's going to take a few hours (yes hours) for the tuning to quit drifting, because you've mechanically disturbed the inductor and it takes a while for it to stop creeping from the mechanical stress.

THE STORY BEHIND THE MODULE

The RF Nomad started out as a germ of an idea between myself and my friend, DSP guru Michael Mecca of Pittsburgh Digital -- we frequently meet for lunch to discuss all things synth. About a year or so ago, he mentioned how much fun he used to have as a kid, playing with his dad's shortwave radio, making crazy squealy noises, listening to the haunting sounds that come over the airwaves. I said I had the same experience as a kid, too. Wouldn't it be cool to make a module that lets you bring that experience into the modular world?

I actually had plenty of experience with radio circuits, and a rudimentary design for a shortwave receiver with voltage-controlled tuning immediately sprang to mind.

Most off the shelf shortwave receivers are AM (amplitude modulation) receivers, which suppress the carrier signal. From my ham radio experience, though, I know that if you listen to shortwave frequencies with a sideband decoder instead of an AM decoder, you hear the carrier signal as well as the audio signal, which I feel is far more interesting as a sound source for a synth than just the plain audio alone. It's the bit that gives you those searing heterodyne squeals.

So, it was decided to go with a "direct-conversion" receiver design, which receives both sidebands. Normally, one doesn't think of a direct conversion receiver when trying to design a modern receiver, because they are very crude. But, in the case of the RF Nomad, crude is exactly what we want! It's gives more squeals, more hiss, more heterodynes, more brutal nasty sonic goodness!

You can alter the tuning with the CV input, like it's a remote control for the tuning knob. Apply an LFO, and the tuning slowly increases and decreases. Attach it to a sequencer, and you can cycle thru stations, or just cycle thru different pitches of squealy heterodynes. Hook it to an envelope generator and get on-demand heterodyne swoops. Hook it to an audio-rate LFO, and now you get freaky FM effects. Really cool if you happen to be receiving a strong broadcast station.

The Nomad tunes roughly 9.6 to 10.0 MHz, which is most active late afternoon to early evening, though YMMV. If you can't get a strong station, you can try extending the antenna (just clip another length of wire onto the end of the supplied antenna). Or, find some old electronics, and drape the antenna over it. Stuff from the 80s/90s era -- Commodore 64's, PC AT's, game consoles, etc. The EMI generated by these devices makes for some interesting sonic material.

If you do want to simply "listen" to shortwave on the Nomad, you'll want a bandpass filter after it. The output is 100% UN-filtered, to allow you to have plenty of material to feed your favorite filters with.

The output of the Nomad can be fed back into it's CV input for some self-modulation fun. Patch the output to a multiple, and then feed one signal from the multiple back into the CV input.

Because the Nomad is a direct-conversion receiver, warts and all, one of those warts is that it is somewhat drifty with temperature. I've done about as much as I can to reduce the driftiness, but you will notice that over several minutes it will wander around a little bit. I felt this was an acceptable trade-off, as the true talent of the Nomad is how well it responds to a quickly changing CV input to generate quirky sounds.

I think that covers the basics. It's pretty versatile for a module that only has one input."

Monday, November 24, 2014

Suzanne Ciani "A Life in Waves" Documentary KickStarter Project

Xenon pinball machine backglass
In the early 80s, i spend many hours behind a Bally Xenon pinball machine at the camping-site in Maria Laach, Germany that we visited every year.
The Xenon is a beautiful machine with amazing futuristic graphics on the backglass and the playfield, and besides that... those amazing hypnotizing sounds and that sexy, female voice...*

More than 15 years later i found out that the music and sounds were created by Suzanne Ciani, and slowly i got to know more about her music and life as a female electronic music pioneer...

Brett Whitcomb, a documentary filmmaker from Houston, Texas. has started a new film project called, "A Life in Waves" about Suzanne Ciani.
"The documentary, co-produced by long-time Beastie Boys keyboardist Money Mark, chronicles Suzanne Ciani's life and work. 
Utilizing a wealth of Suzanne's archival footage, the film will be a nostalgic, visually-compelling look at one woman's journey, and the trials she had to overcome to succeed in a traditionally male-dominated art form."

You can donate/find more info about this KickStarter project at 
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2100662212/suzanne-ciani-a-life-in-waves

I am really looking forward to this documentary, and i hope they will get the funds together...
The campaign ends on Wednesday, Dec 10th 2014 10:07 PM CET.

Suzanne Ciani's official website: http://www.sevwave.com/
Suzanne Cianni on Twitter https://twitter.com/sevwave
Check her out on Facebook (with some awesome classic gear-pictures)
,or read her blog HERE (although she hasn't updated in a while)

* You can learn more about Ciani's involvement in the Xenon pinnball machine at her official website, which has a lot of information about this game.
(including this amazing 'making of Xenon' video and soundpacks)


Sunday, November 23, 2014

Random Video: Benjolin DPO by Severence

...and another one from YouTube, by Severence

Video: severence // benjolin dpo

" // experimenting with the epoch modular eurorack version of rob hordijk's benjolin and the make noise dual prismatic oscillator.
patch notes:
// benjolin high and band pass outs into schippmann vcf-02 filter
// dpo saw tooth and sine wave outs into make noise mmg
// steady state fate ultra random clock out striking dpo, cycling maths and brain seed, triggering quantimator, gating modcan quad lfo and wmd sequential switch matrix. Self patched clock fm from sample out a.
// mmg freq 1 modulated by ssf ultra random sample out b
// dpo osc 1 expo fm from wmd ssm expand 1-3 out
// dpo osc 2 expo fm from wmd ssm expand 1-4 out
// modcan quad lfo 4 to quantimator in
// ssf quantum rainbow 2 patched into intellijel planar, cv from modcan quad lfo 4 and maths eoc
// brain seed seed out modulating vca with ssf quantum rainbow 2
// schippmann filter modulated by quantimator out 3 and modcan quad lfo 4
// desk effects: space, el capistan & moogerfoogers"

Video uploaded by severence

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Random Video: Techno Witch - August Modular (stereo acid)

Found on YouTube...

Video: Techno Witch - August Modular (stereo acid)

" Created using the modular 303 and the Doepfer modular system. Kick thumps from the TipTop Audio 909/808 modules. MFB drums. Some mini-brute, some rocket. A touch of Metavox as finish."

Uploaded by technowitch0031
More info at http://technowitch.nl/

Friday, November 21, 2014

Doepfer A-116 Voltage Controlled Waveform Processor Video Tutorials by Raul Pena

Raul Pena just started a new series on the Doepfer A-116 VC Waveform Processor.
Here's the first video.

Video 1: Doepfer A-116 VC Waveform Processor Basic Features

" A short introduction to the features of the Doepfer A116 Voltage Controlled Waveform Processor. A short demonstration with audio is included. Video one of three.Sound and Video by Raul Pena."

Video 2: Doepfer A116 VC Waveform processor-Audio/Oscilloscope Views Pt.1
" Continuing the Doepfer A116 VC Waveform Processor series. This time we look at oscilloscope views of the effects of the A116 on a basic Sine and Triangle Wave. Video Two of Four in series..Sound and Video by Raul Pena."

Video 3: Doepfer A116 VC Waveform processor-Audio/Oscilloscope Views Pt.2

"Continuing the Doepfer A116 VC Waveform Processor-Audio Oscilloscope segment. This time we look at more oscilloscope views of the effects of the A116. Video Two of Four in series..Sound and Video by Raul Pena."

Check out Raul's latest survey at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/K3Z9PVF

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Transistor Sounds Labs Stepper Acid Digitally Controlled Step Sequencer

Like most of you, i have been following this next project for a long time... but it's finally out now and the first ones have been shipped.

The Transistor Sounds Labs Stepper Acid is a 16-step Eurorack sequencer module designed by Nina Richards & Zoë Blade with live performance in mind.
The Stepper Acid was born out of our need for a modern step-sequencer.
The dual micro-controller design ensures tight timing: one runs the sequencer, the other the front panel interface.

It looks and sounds very impressive, and very easy to program... especially compared to a 303 ;-) ...

Transistor Sounds Labs Stepper Acid Digitally Controlled Step Sequencer
Features:
-16-step sequencer
- With adjustable pattern length
- Adjustable analogue slide
- Song mode for pattern chaining
- Stores up to 40 patterns
- Detach mode for playing one pattern while entering another
- 0-5V range CV (5 octaves)
- Gate and accent output
- 5V or 12V selectable
- Variable swing function
- Dual microcontroller design
- Adjustable clock sync input and output
- Includes: 24PPQN (Sync24), 48PPQN, 96PPQN and 4PPQN (one note per pulse)
- Assembled in the UK
- Dimensions
- Width: 32HP Eurorack module
- Depth (excluding faceplate): 31.5mm

Video 1: Stepper Acid Guide

"A guide to the various features of Stepper Acid."

Video 2: Stepper Acid Extended Demo

"We were making some demos of Stepper Acid's features, and Nina got carried away making a track. Enjoy!"

All info at http://www.transistorsoundslabs.com/stepper-acid/
and on MuffWiggler: http://www.muffwiggler.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=118964&highlight=stepper+acid

Stepper Acid is available for £295.00
For more information e-mail info@transistorsoundslabs.com

Latest Updates on Twitter: @TSLNow

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Doepfer A-147-2 Voltage Controlled Delayed LFO Announced

Doepfer recently announced the A-147-2, the successor of the VCLFO A-147.
This module but offers more features than the predecessor and is made of the following sub-units:

VCLFO: voltage controlled low frequency oscillator
VCA: voltage controlled amplifier, switchable to voltage controlled polarizer
VC delay unit: voltage controlled linear attack envelope (only one parameter: attack) for delayed LFO operation in combination with the VCA (e.g. delayed vibrato/tremolo)

"LFO: The voltage controlled LFO has the waveforms Triangle, Sine, Sawtooth and Rectangle available and features a Reset/Sync input. Triangle/Sine and Rectangle are displayed by means of dual-color LEDs (probably red/green), Sawtooth has a unicolor LED available (probably blue). 
The output levels are about -4V...+4V for Triangle, Sine and Rectangle. 
The Sawtooth level is about 0...+8V.
The CV control can be switched to attenuator or polarizer ("CV Mode" switch). 
In polarizer mode the CV inputs affects the frequency in the reverse manner when the CV control is left from the center position. In the center position CV has no effect and right from the center the control works like a normal attenuator. 
The frequency range (without external CV) is from about 0,005 Hz (i.e. about 3 minutes per periode) to 200 Hz. In addition a ultra-low mode can be activated by means of an internal jumper. 
When the ultra-low jumper is set a fixed voltage is connected to the switching contact of the "LFO CV" socket. In polarizer mode of the CV control that way extremely low frequencies (up to one hour period and more) are possible.

VCA: This is a linear VCA that can be switched to "normal" VCA (i.e. kind of a voltage controlled attenuator) or voltage controlled polarizer ("VCA Mode" switch). 
In the "normal" VCA mode amplification +1 is achieved with about +5V control voltage. 
In polarizer mode the amplification ranges from about -0.5 (i.e. inverted signal with about 50% level) with 0V CV to +0.5 (i.e. non-inverted signal with about 50% level) with +5V CV. With about +2.5V CV the signal is suppressed.
Details about the functioning of a voltage controlled polarizer can be found in the description of the module A-133. In this mode the VCA can be treated also a DC coupled ring modulator (similar to A-114).
The VCA of the A-147-2 has three sockets available: "In" (signal input), "Out" (signal output) and "CV" (control voltage input).
The Triangle Output of the LFO is normalled to the VCA signal input by means of the switching contact of the "VCA In" socket. If another LFO waveform (or any other signal) should be processed by the VCA the corresponding signal has to be patched to the "VCA In" socket. 
The VCA can be used also independently from the LFO and the Delay CV. 
In this case the VCA sockets In, Out and CV have to be patched accordingly. The VCA can be used also as waveshaper for the LFO signals (e.g. by patching VCA In and VCA CV to different LFO signals, if necessary via attenuator A-183-1 or offset generator/attenuator A-183-2).

A-147-2 block diagram
Attack/Delay: The third sub-unit of the module is a simple, voltage controlled envelope generator that has only the parameter "Delay" (or Attack) available. 
This unit generates a linear increasing voltage that starts from 0V after each Delay Reset until it reaches about +5V.
Then the voltage remains at +5V until the next Delay Reset occurs. 
The inclination or gradient is controlled by the manual Delay control and the Delay control voltage ("Delay CV" input). 
The waveform is linear, the control scale is exponential. The output voltage is displayed by a unicolor LED (probably orange) and available at the "Delay Out" socket.
The manual Delay control ranges - without external "Delay CV" - from about 5ms (fully CW) up to 2 minutes (fully CCW). By means of an external voltage applied to the "Delay CV" socket this range can be extended. A rising CV shortens the delay time (behaviour like a VCO) !
The Delay output voltage ranges from about 0V to +5V. The rising edge of the gate, clock or trigger signal applied to the "Delay Reset" sockets resets the Delay output voltage to 0 V.
"Delay Out" is normalled to the VCA CV input by means of the switching contact of the "VCA CV" socket and consequently controls the Triangle level provided that no other patch is made. 
A typical example is the usage of a Gate signal (e.g. from a USB/Midi-to-CV/Gate interface) as Delay Reset. 
That way a delayed vibrato or tremolo can be realized if the VCA output is patched to the frequency CV input of a VCO (or VCF), or the CV input of a VCA.
But the Delay sub-unit can be used also independently from the LFO and VCA, e.g. as a voltage controlled waveshaper or for other applications where a linear increasing signal with voltage controlled steepness is required."

The module is planned for early 2015, price ~ Euro 120.00, price and release date are still without obligation !

Monday, November 17, 2014

Ladik EQ-5 / E-110 5-Band EQ Demo Video by @DivKid

DivKid's latest video shows you all the details of the Ladik EQ-5 / E-110 5-Band Equalizer... Enjoy!

Video: LADIK - EQ-5 / E-110 5-Band EQ

"A dirty cheap (picked it up for £32, new they are less than £50) 5 band EQ from LADIK. The module has +/- 12dB EQ at 12.8kHz, 3.2kHz, 800Hz, 200Hz and 50Hz. Really nice to have some proper EQ shaping in my set up.
As always hit subscribe and like for more videos every week and ask any questions in the comments."

Video by Ben Wilson / DivKid - www.youtube.com/divkidvideo